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Format:
Book
Author:
Title:
Edition:
1st ed.
Publisher, Date:
New York : W.W. Norton, c2006.
Description:
299 p. ; 25 cm.
Subjects:
Contents:
Back story -- The market for football players -- Crossing the line -- The blank slate -- Death of a lineman -- Inventing Michael -- The pasta coach -- Character courses -- Birth of a star -- The egg bowl -- Freak of nature -- And Moses stuttered.
LCCN:
2006023509
ISBN:
039306123X (hardcover)
9780393338386 (pbk.)
9780393061239
Other Number:
70884918
System Availability:
2
Current Holds:
0
# Local items:
2
Control Number:
155781
Call Number:
796.33264 LEW
# Local items in:
1
# System items in:
1
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Author Notes
Michael Lewis was born in New Orleans, Louisiana on October 15, 1960. He received a BA in art history from Princeton University in 1982 and a Masters in economics from the London School of Economics in 1985. He is a non-fiction author/journalist of mostly financial themes. His books include Liar's Poker, Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, The Blind Side: Evolution of a Game, The Money Culture, Boomerang, Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt, The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine and The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)
Fiction/Biography Profile
Genre
NonFiction
Book tie-in
Sports
Topics
Football
Football players
Athletes
College sports
Sports recruiting
Family relationships
Adoption
Adopted children
African Americans
African American men
Setting
Mississippi - South (U.S.)
Time Period
2000s -- 21st century
Large Cover Image
Trade Reviews

  Library Journal Review

Lewis here weaves together two very interesting tales. The first relates to the rising salaries of National Football League (NFL) offensive left tackles large enough, agile enough, and fast enough to protect a quarterback, keep him from being blindsided, possibly fumbling, and perhaps suffering game- or career-ending injuries. The second is the incredible journey of young African American Michael Oher, touted as a future NFL starting offensive tackle, who rose from virtual homelessness in Memphis to play football at a white, evangelical Christian high school and was adopted into a well-to-do white family. The confluence of events involving Oher and Tennessee prep football is very well told by sportswriter Lewis. The listener also gains insight into recruiting at the college level and the economics of free agency in professional football. Stephen Hoye reads the story with spirit and feeling. Very highly recommended for sports collections.-Cliff Glaviano, Bowling Green State Univ. Libs., OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

  Publishers Weekly Review

As he did so memorably for baseball in Moneyball, Lewis takes a statistical X-ray of the hidden substructure of football, outlining the invisible doings of unsung players that determine the outcome more than the showy exploits of point scorers. In his sketch of the gridiron arms race, first came the modern, meticulously choreographed passing offense, then the ferocious defensive pass rusher whose bone-crunching quarterback sacks demolished the best-laid passing game, and finally the rise of the left tackle the offensive lineman tasked with protecting the quarterback from the pass rusher whose presence is felt only through the game-deciding absence of said sacks. A rare creature combining 300 pounds of bulk with "the body control of a ballerina," the anonymous left tackle, Lewis notes, is now often a team's highest-paid player. Lewis fleshes this out with the colorful saga of left tackle prodigy Michael Oher. An intermittently homeless Memphis ghetto kid taken in by a rich white family and a Christian high school, Oher's preternatural size and agility soon has every college coach in the country courting him obsequiously. Combining a tour de force of sports analysis with a piquant ethnography of the South's pigskin mania, Lewis probes the fascinating question of whether football is a matter of brute force or subtle intellect. Photos. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Summary
The young man at the center of this extraordinary and moving story will one day be among the most highly paid athletes in the National Football League. When we first meet him, he is one of thirteen children by a mother addicted to crack; he does not know his real name, his father, his birthday, or any of the things a child might learn in school such as, say, how to read or write. Nor has he ever touched a football.<br> <br> What changes? He takes up football, and school, after a rich, Evangelical, Republican family plucks him from the mean streets. Their love is the first great force that alters the world's perception of the boy, whom they adopt. The second force is the evolution of professional football itself into a game where the quarterback must be protected at any cost. Our protagonist turns out to be the priceless combination of size, speed, and agility necessary to guard the quarterback's greatest vulnerability: his blind side.
Librarian's View
Book
2006

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